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.Net Charts and Graphs Interact with Businesses and Customers

Written By: Joe Miller

Bar charts, bar graphs, and any other chart or graph used in financial statements, inventory reports, sales reports, a slew of other types of reports have typically been paper reports or online reports depicting various levels of complex information for tracking, investing, planning, and buying. However, until the .net graph, .net chart, .net map, and other .net charts came along, the relationship between management and the company, companies and their investors, and companies and their customers was missing.

Interactivity is just one attribute of .net technology, a technology which is spreading across the nation as companies recognize it a bridge over the gap between them and investors, customers, clients, and their own departments. Using a web-based .net map or chart opens up communication and collaboration between various business demographics. For example, management may want to track a product inventory through a given time period. A .net map can show warehouse locations and inventory levels in real-time. Warehouse managers will be able to track incoming and outgoing inventory, listing information on real-time .net charts and .net graphs.

In addition to internal informational tracking, companies can post interactive data for customers, clients, and investors. Perhaps you have already seen how this works with interactive .net maps of states or countries. As the mouse moves over the counties in the state or states in the country, information about climate, population, government, agriculture, etc. may pop up. You can even drill down to more specific locations and information by clicking on the state or county you want to see.

This type of interaction is ideal for students doing research, parents making vacation plans, even businessmen or women making flight reservations. Many airlines, for example, use .net maps to help customers choose their own seats.

I have touched on many of the research and travel interaction created through .net maps and charts, but there are other benefits to individuals filling the role of investor, client, employee, and customer.

Investors have access to financial statements prepared with .net technology, making it easier for them to sift through multiple levels of information important to their investment decisions.

Clients have the ability to check the status of their orders or to track the progress of systems or other developing projects.

Employees may manage and review 401k or other benefit information.

Customers may not only research products they are interested in buying, but they can also, in many cases, test them out online.

Perhaps one of the best features of .net technology, including the .net chart, the .net map, and the .net graph, is that all .net charts are convertible to PDF through .net PDF technology. In other words, printing .net maps and charts will no longer cause the right margin of the page to cut off much of the information. The .net map, as you see it, will convert to an 8.5 x 11 sheet of printed paper.

Technology is marching forward, and in the search for helpful informational technology that will bridge gaps among business demographics, .net maps, charts, and graphs, will interact with and work with employees, customers, clients, and investors to bring everyone onto the same page.

About the Author

Joe Miller is an author of informational articles and online advertisements on business, technology, and health. Information on .net map, .net chart, .net graph is available at Corda.com.

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